Moc Chau preserves traditional brocade weaving

VOV.VN - Moc Chau district in Son La province attracts visitors by its natural landscape and the unique cultural practices of local ethnic minority groups such as brocade weaving.

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Brocade weaving improves living conditions for local ethnic people in Moc Chau district, Son La. (Photo: baosonla.org.vn)

Currently brocade products made by local artisans with diverse designs and delicate patterns have been welcomed by domestic and foreign tourists. The most distinctive items include “Pieu” scarf, bags, curtains, and “ao com”, the traditional costume of Thai women.

With a desire to preserve the tradition of the Thai ethnic group Luong Thi Sen of Ang hamlet in Moc Chau has, for dozens of years, taught brocade weaving to young villagers.

Every day she enthusiastically demonstrates to visitors how to work with the looms, spin yarns, create patterns, and weave and dye brocade.

Ms. Sen recalls: “In the past after cotton trees were grown up, we would root them out, roll them up and pull yarn from them. First the yarns were soaked in rice water, then dried, and dyed with purple or green leaves. Without red leaves, we had to use the brownish color instead.”

Women of Dong Sang commune are keeping dozens of brocade weaving looms in a hope to learn, preserve, and develop the traditional craft. Products like scarves, bags, bed sheets, pillows, and mattresses are displayed and sold for tourists and also popularly used in guest houses to serve tourists.

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An artisan in Moc Chau is teaching the craft to a local little girl. (Photo: baosonla.org.vn)

Each weaver earns nearly US$200 per month on average. Dao Yen Nhi, a visitor from Hanoi, shared her feeling: “Brocade weaving is interesting, creating beauty of the Thai ethnic minority group. I like to experience working with the looms.”

Every day after finishing the farm work, local women gather at the Community House of Culture to learn embroidery and weaving techniques or how to dye a piece of cloth with beautiful and durable colors.

Dinh Thi Huong, head of Moc Chau district’s culture and information section, said: “Each household will be allocated an amount of money to repair their looms and display cabinets. In addition every 7 households which cooperate with each other to form a cooperative will receive a funding worth more than US$300."

Currently brocade products made by local artisans with diverse designs and delicate patterns have been welcomed by domestic and foreign tourists. The most distinctive items include “Pieu” scarf, bags, curtains, and “ao com”, the traditional costume of Thai women.

VOV

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